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Pizza Huts Offer Dessert, and Jalapeno-Filled Crusts Abroad

Pizza Huts Offer Dessert, and Jalapeno-Filled Crusts Abroad


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First marmite, and now this. And all we get in America is cheese-stuffed crust.

Pizza Hut is stretching the limits of pizza-stuffing capabilities with new creations abroad including the cheese and jalapeño-stuffed crust in Middle Eastern Pizza Hut locations (near and around the United Arab Emirates), and even more perplexingly—the “Star Edge Pizza” in South Korea, which features a surf n’ turf pizza slice and a crust stuffed with sweet turnover dessert. It’s dinner and a dessert all in one!

We have no idea how these unusual pizzas would fare if they were introduced stateside, but here’s a sneak-peak of the international Pizza Hut goodies: the jalapeño-stuffed crust is no joke, and is stuffed with cheese and red or green jalapeños, and topped with spicy nacho seasoning and chili hot sauce instead of traditional pizza sauce, making it one of Pizza Hut’s spiciest creations ever.

The extremely quirky Star Edge Pizza may as well be called the kitchen sink slice, because it’s topped with shrimp, calamari, homemade sausage, bacon, steak, broccoli, carrots and onions. At least this crowded stir-fry pie saves time and dishes by having the dessert in the crust. The two-in-one pie ends with a crust that’s shaped like little turnovers filled with either cranberries and cream cheese or cinnamon apple nut and cream cheese.

For the latest happenings in the food and drink world, visit our Food News page.

Joanna Fantozzi is an Associate Editor with The Daily Meal. Follow her on Twitter @JoannaFantozzi


ANY WAY YOU SLICE IT WITHG NEW TOPPINGS RANGING FROM THAI TO CAJUN, PIZZA CAN BE JUST ABOUT ANYTHING YOU WANT IT TO BE.

The culinary traditions of Italy and China seem likely to merge atop a pizza crust.

At the spring Pizza Expo in Las Vegas, where thousands of people in the industry gathered, an Oriental stir-fry recipe out of Louisville was named Pizza of the Year.

Soon, this concoction could be delivered to your door.

Pizza does not stand still.

As gastronomic trends, such as Thai and Cajun, roll across America, neighborhood pizzerias and national chains alike offer ethnic and herbal blends on hot sliced pizzas packed in boxes.

Pizza all the way? It's beyond that: It's pizza all the way around the world, and back again.

No longer Italian, no longer American, pizza is global.

In Japan, you can choose squid or eel for toppings. In Pakistan, order a curry pizza, but next door in India, forget about beef. Cows are sacred.

In Russia, no surprise, red herring is a favorite ingredient although President Boris Yeltsin dined on pies delivered by the Moscow Pizza Hut when he fought off the power usurpers in the coup attempt of 1991, presumably with more familiar garnishments as he held onto his democratic government.

All this information is provided by the National Association of Pizza Operators, with headquarters in New Albany, Ind. The association also says that such ``gourmet'' toppings as oysters, crayfish, dandelions, sprouts and eggplant are gaining ground in the United States.

Some chefs have even tried pizza with peanut butter and jelly, as well as mashed potatoes and bacon and eggs, says an association fact sheet.

``Pizza is emerging as a dessert, as a breakfast entree,'' boasts Gerry Durnell, director of the pizza operators group and editor of Pizza Today magazine. ``They all fall under the umbrella and we don't discriminate.''

Some more recent trends include drive-through restaurants, buffet lines and pies offered by the slice.

Despite the inroads made by gourmet pies, a California innovation, pepperoni is America's favorite topping, the operators association reports. Mushrooms, sausage, green pepper and onion follow. The traditional pizza is a long way from being dethroned.

``There are strong regional preferences,'' Durnell says, adding that Hampton Roads prefers a thin to medium thickness in crusts, with familiar ingredients.

In other words, the chain restaurants like Pizza Hut, Little Caesar's, Domino's andChanello's serve up just what we like.

``The area's taste is conservative,'' says George Poulos, owner of Jimmy's Pizza in the Hilltop area of Virginia Beach. ``I try to keep a local awareness and serve the neighborhood.''

To compete with the chains, he tries to keep his pies inexpensive and doesn't try to lure customers from too far beyond his store.

Poulos began delivering pizzas in 1980, possibly the first local operator to do so after Domino's.

Still, Jimmy's has a few of the newer products - white cheese, Hawaiian flavoring, Greek toppings - because some of his clientele have asked for them.

Another local entrepreneur, Anthony DiSilvestro, goes up against the chains by computerizing his accounts and working 100 hours a week at the Y-Not Pizza in Great Neck Square, Virginia Beach.

``If you want to stay in this business, you've got to do it,'' he insists. He and his wife, Cyndi, moved here from New Jersey and opened their restaurant a year and a half ago.

The Y-Not (``Tony'' spelled backward) specializes is a New York-style pizza: ``It's a thin crust, crispier than the chains, with fresh ingredients and traditional toppings,'' DiSilvestro says. He also says he has imported New York prices, which are lower than the chains.

New York still carries a lofty image in pizza lore. The first American pizzeria, Lombardi's, opened in the Big Apple in 1905. But Chicago also has its ``deep-dish'' pizza tradition. It's spreading across the nation with the chain Pizzeria Uno, which recently opened an outlet at Janaf Shopping Plaza in Norfolk.

``The dough is given extra time to rise,'' explains Mills Kilbourne, manager of the local Pizzeria Uno. ``The pie is filled, not topped.''

But even within the pizza genre, there are variances of opinion. The deep-dish Chicago-style product sold by Cafe 21 on West 21st Street in Norfolk is ``an encased pizza,'' according to John Glenn, a waiter there. ``There's dough on top and bottom with the ingredients inside and sauce on top. It's more like a pie.'' GOURMET STYLE

If Hampton Roads likes mozzarella cheese and pepperoni, there still appears to be ample room for the stuff invading from the West Coast.

Mike Cavish, owner of Fellini's, also on West 21st Street in Norfolk, is a believer. So are the customers who crowd Fellini's foyer every evening, waiting to be seated or to pick up takeout orders. Pizzas on the Fellini's menu include Shrimp Pesto, Cajun, Lime Chicken, Thai and 15 others.

Cavish, who started with eight pizzas six years ago, has since expanded his dining capacity from five tables to 38. He says the gourmet pies ``have revived the pizza industry.''

Fellini's best sellers are the white pizza, made with mozzarella, Fontina, smoked Gouda and Romano cheeses and spinach, and the fresh tomato with basil, garlic and mozzarella.

Cavish stays ahead of the curve by keeping pizza on his brain, even while driving. Sometimes he color-coordinates pizzas. His latest vision, for example, was black: beans, andouille sausage, red and green onions and sour cream. Presto, a Cuban pizza.

Whatever its form, pizza is the nation's favorite restaurant food, with 60,000 outlets dispensing it.

We eat 100 acres of it per day, according to the pizza operators association. Pizzeria growth outpaces overall restaurant growth.

Pizza is now No. 1 among lunch and dinner entrees eaten at home, according to report in the Washington Post. Ten years ago, it was eighth, just behind the bologna sandwich.

It's profitable for the big chains as well as the little entrepreneur. ``It's hard work and long hours,'' says the pizza operators' Durnell. ``But a neat way to see a product from inception to completion.

``It's an inexpensive meal,'' he adds. ``All food groups are represented. It's tasty. In school lunch surveys, kids put it No. 1.

``There are lots of choices today. You can eat it with your hands. It's a fun food, a friendly food.'' ILLUSTRATION: Staff color photos by LAWRENCE JACKSON


ANY WAY YOU SLICE IT WITHG NEW TOPPINGS RANGING FROM THAI TO CAJUN, PIZZA CAN BE JUST ABOUT ANYTHING YOU WANT IT TO BE.

The culinary traditions of Italy and China seem likely to merge atop a pizza crust.

At the spring Pizza Expo in Las Vegas, where thousands of people in the industry gathered, an Oriental stir-fry recipe out of Louisville was named Pizza of the Year.

Soon, this concoction could be delivered to your door.

Pizza does not stand still.

As gastronomic trends, such as Thai and Cajun, roll across America, neighborhood pizzerias and national chains alike offer ethnic and herbal blends on hot sliced pizzas packed in boxes.

Pizza all the way? It's beyond that: It's pizza all the way around the world, and back again.

No longer Italian, no longer American, pizza is global.

In Japan, you can choose squid or eel for toppings. In Pakistan, order a curry pizza, but next door in India, forget about beef. Cows are sacred.

In Russia, no surprise, red herring is a favorite ingredient although President Boris Yeltsin dined on pies delivered by the Moscow Pizza Hut when he fought off the power usurpers in the coup attempt of 1991, presumably with more familiar garnishments as he held onto his democratic government.

All this information is provided by the National Association of Pizza Operators, with headquarters in New Albany, Ind. The association also says that such ``gourmet'' toppings as oysters, crayfish, dandelions, sprouts and eggplant are gaining ground in the United States.

Some chefs have even tried pizza with peanut butter and jelly, as well as mashed potatoes and bacon and eggs, says an association fact sheet.

``Pizza is emerging as a dessert, as a breakfast entree,'' boasts Gerry Durnell, director of the pizza operators group and editor of Pizza Today magazine. ``They all fall under the umbrella and we don't discriminate.''

Some more recent trends include drive-through restaurants, buffet lines and pies offered by the slice.

Despite the inroads made by gourmet pies, a California innovation, pepperoni is America's favorite topping, the operators association reports. Mushrooms, sausage, green pepper and onion follow. The traditional pizza is a long way from being dethroned.

``There are strong regional preferences,'' Durnell says, adding that Hampton Roads prefers a thin to medium thickness in crusts, with familiar ingredients.

In other words, the chain restaurants like Pizza Hut, Little Caesar's, Domino's andChanello's serve up just what we like.

``The area's taste is conservative,'' says George Poulos, owner of Jimmy's Pizza in the Hilltop area of Virginia Beach. ``I try to keep a local awareness and serve the neighborhood.''

To compete with the chains, he tries to keep his pies inexpensive and doesn't try to lure customers from too far beyond his store.

Poulos began delivering pizzas in 1980, possibly the first local operator to do so after Domino's.

Still, Jimmy's has a few of the newer products - white cheese, Hawaiian flavoring, Greek toppings - because some of his clientele have asked for them.

Another local entrepreneur, Anthony DiSilvestro, goes up against the chains by computerizing his accounts and working 100 hours a week at the Y-Not Pizza in Great Neck Square, Virginia Beach.

``If you want to stay in this business, you've got to do it,'' he insists. He and his wife, Cyndi, moved here from New Jersey and opened their restaurant a year and a half ago.

The Y-Not (``Tony'' spelled backward) specializes is a New York-style pizza: ``It's a thin crust, crispier than the chains, with fresh ingredients and traditional toppings,'' DiSilvestro says. He also says he has imported New York prices, which are lower than the chains.

New York still carries a lofty image in pizza lore. The first American pizzeria, Lombardi's, opened in the Big Apple in 1905. But Chicago also has its ``deep-dish'' pizza tradition. It's spreading across the nation with the chain Pizzeria Uno, which recently opened an outlet at Janaf Shopping Plaza in Norfolk.

``The dough is given extra time to rise,'' explains Mills Kilbourne, manager of the local Pizzeria Uno. ``The pie is filled, not topped.''

But even within the pizza genre, there are variances of opinion. The deep-dish Chicago-style product sold by Cafe 21 on West 21st Street in Norfolk is ``an encased pizza,'' according to John Glenn, a waiter there. ``There's dough on top and bottom with the ingredients inside and sauce on top. It's more like a pie.'' GOURMET STYLE

If Hampton Roads likes mozzarella cheese and pepperoni, there still appears to be ample room for the stuff invading from the West Coast.

Mike Cavish, owner of Fellini's, also on West 21st Street in Norfolk, is a believer. So are the customers who crowd Fellini's foyer every evening, waiting to be seated or to pick up takeout orders. Pizzas on the Fellini's menu include Shrimp Pesto, Cajun, Lime Chicken, Thai and 15 others.

Cavish, who started with eight pizzas six years ago, has since expanded his dining capacity from five tables to 38. He says the gourmet pies ``have revived the pizza industry.''

Fellini's best sellers are the white pizza, made with mozzarella, Fontina, smoked Gouda and Romano cheeses and spinach, and the fresh tomato with basil, garlic and mozzarella.

Cavish stays ahead of the curve by keeping pizza on his brain, even while driving. Sometimes he color-coordinates pizzas. His latest vision, for example, was black: beans, andouille sausage, red and green onions and sour cream. Presto, a Cuban pizza.

Whatever its form, pizza is the nation's favorite restaurant food, with 60,000 outlets dispensing it.

We eat 100 acres of it per day, according to the pizza operators association. Pizzeria growth outpaces overall restaurant growth.

Pizza is now No. 1 among lunch and dinner entrees eaten at home, according to report in the Washington Post. Ten years ago, it was eighth, just behind the bologna sandwich.

It's profitable for the big chains as well as the little entrepreneur. ``It's hard work and long hours,'' says the pizza operators' Durnell. ``But a neat way to see a product from inception to completion.

``It's an inexpensive meal,'' he adds. ``All food groups are represented. It's tasty. In school lunch surveys, kids put it No. 1.

``There are lots of choices today. You can eat it with your hands. It's a fun food, a friendly food.'' ILLUSTRATION: Staff color photos by LAWRENCE JACKSON


ANY WAY YOU SLICE IT WITHG NEW TOPPINGS RANGING FROM THAI TO CAJUN, PIZZA CAN BE JUST ABOUT ANYTHING YOU WANT IT TO BE.

The culinary traditions of Italy and China seem likely to merge atop a pizza crust.

At the spring Pizza Expo in Las Vegas, where thousands of people in the industry gathered, an Oriental stir-fry recipe out of Louisville was named Pizza of the Year.

Soon, this concoction could be delivered to your door.

Pizza does not stand still.

As gastronomic trends, such as Thai and Cajun, roll across America, neighborhood pizzerias and national chains alike offer ethnic and herbal blends on hot sliced pizzas packed in boxes.

Pizza all the way? It's beyond that: It's pizza all the way around the world, and back again.

No longer Italian, no longer American, pizza is global.

In Japan, you can choose squid or eel for toppings. In Pakistan, order a curry pizza, but next door in India, forget about beef. Cows are sacred.

In Russia, no surprise, red herring is a favorite ingredient although President Boris Yeltsin dined on pies delivered by the Moscow Pizza Hut when he fought off the power usurpers in the coup attempt of 1991, presumably with more familiar garnishments as he held onto his democratic government.

All this information is provided by the National Association of Pizza Operators, with headquarters in New Albany, Ind. The association also says that such ``gourmet'' toppings as oysters, crayfish, dandelions, sprouts and eggplant are gaining ground in the United States.

Some chefs have even tried pizza with peanut butter and jelly, as well as mashed potatoes and bacon and eggs, says an association fact sheet.

``Pizza is emerging as a dessert, as a breakfast entree,'' boasts Gerry Durnell, director of the pizza operators group and editor of Pizza Today magazine. ``They all fall under the umbrella and we don't discriminate.''

Some more recent trends include drive-through restaurants, buffet lines and pies offered by the slice.

Despite the inroads made by gourmet pies, a California innovation, pepperoni is America's favorite topping, the operators association reports. Mushrooms, sausage, green pepper and onion follow. The traditional pizza is a long way from being dethroned.

``There are strong regional preferences,'' Durnell says, adding that Hampton Roads prefers a thin to medium thickness in crusts, with familiar ingredients.

In other words, the chain restaurants like Pizza Hut, Little Caesar's, Domino's andChanello's serve up just what we like.

``The area's taste is conservative,'' says George Poulos, owner of Jimmy's Pizza in the Hilltop area of Virginia Beach. ``I try to keep a local awareness and serve the neighborhood.''

To compete with the chains, he tries to keep his pies inexpensive and doesn't try to lure customers from too far beyond his store.

Poulos began delivering pizzas in 1980, possibly the first local operator to do so after Domino's.

Still, Jimmy's has a few of the newer products - white cheese, Hawaiian flavoring, Greek toppings - because some of his clientele have asked for them.

Another local entrepreneur, Anthony DiSilvestro, goes up against the chains by computerizing his accounts and working 100 hours a week at the Y-Not Pizza in Great Neck Square, Virginia Beach.

``If you want to stay in this business, you've got to do it,'' he insists. He and his wife, Cyndi, moved here from New Jersey and opened their restaurant a year and a half ago.

The Y-Not (``Tony'' spelled backward) specializes is a New York-style pizza: ``It's a thin crust, crispier than the chains, with fresh ingredients and traditional toppings,'' DiSilvestro says. He also says he has imported New York prices, which are lower than the chains.

New York still carries a lofty image in pizza lore. The first American pizzeria, Lombardi's, opened in the Big Apple in 1905. But Chicago also has its ``deep-dish'' pizza tradition. It's spreading across the nation with the chain Pizzeria Uno, which recently opened an outlet at Janaf Shopping Plaza in Norfolk.

``The dough is given extra time to rise,'' explains Mills Kilbourne, manager of the local Pizzeria Uno. ``The pie is filled, not topped.''

But even within the pizza genre, there are variances of opinion. The deep-dish Chicago-style product sold by Cafe 21 on West 21st Street in Norfolk is ``an encased pizza,'' according to John Glenn, a waiter there. ``There's dough on top and bottom with the ingredients inside and sauce on top. It's more like a pie.'' GOURMET STYLE

If Hampton Roads likes mozzarella cheese and pepperoni, there still appears to be ample room for the stuff invading from the West Coast.

Mike Cavish, owner of Fellini's, also on West 21st Street in Norfolk, is a believer. So are the customers who crowd Fellini's foyer every evening, waiting to be seated or to pick up takeout orders. Pizzas on the Fellini's menu include Shrimp Pesto, Cajun, Lime Chicken, Thai and 15 others.

Cavish, who started with eight pizzas six years ago, has since expanded his dining capacity from five tables to 38. He says the gourmet pies ``have revived the pizza industry.''

Fellini's best sellers are the white pizza, made with mozzarella, Fontina, smoked Gouda and Romano cheeses and spinach, and the fresh tomato with basil, garlic and mozzarella.

Cavish stays ahead of the curve by keeping pizza on his brain, even while driving. Sometimes he color-coordinates pizzas. His latest vision, for example, was black: beans, andouille sausage, red and green onions and sour cream. Presto, a Cuban pizza.

Whatever its form, pizza is the nation's favorite restaurant food, with 60,000 outlets dispensing it.

We eat 100 acres of it per day, according to the pizza operators association. Pizzeria growth outpaces overall restaurant growth.

Pizza is now No. 1 among lunch and dinner entrees eaten at home, according to report in the Washington Post. Ten years ago, it was eighth, just behind the bologna sandwich.

It's profitable for the big chains as well as the little entrepreneur. ``It's hard work and long hours,'' says the pizza operators' Durnell. ``But a neat way to see a product from inception to completion.

``It's an inexpensive meal,'' he adds. ``All food groups are represented. It's tasty. In school lunch surveys, kids put it No. 1.

``There are lots of choices today. You can eat it with your hands. It's a fun food, a friendly food.'' ILLUSTRATION: Staff color photos by LAWRENCE JACKSON


ANY WAY YOU SLICE IT WITHG NEW TOPPINGS RANGING FROM THAI TO CAJUN, PIZZA CAN BE JUST ABOUT ANYTHING YOU WANT IT TO BE.

The culinary traditions of Italy and China seem likely to merge atop a pizza crust.

At the spring Pizza Expo in Las Vegas, where thousands of people in the industry gathered, an Oriental stir-fry recipe out of Louisville was named Pizza of the Year.

Soon, this concoction could be delivered to your door.

Pizza does not stand still.

As gastronomic trends, such as Thai and Cajun, roll across America, neighborhood pizzerias and national chains alike offer ethnic and herbal blends on hot sliced pizzas packed in boxes.

Pizza all the way? It's beyond that: It's pizza all the way around the world, and back again.

No longer Italian, no longer American, pizza is global.

In Japan, you can choose squid or eel for toppings. In Pakistan, order a curry pizza, but next door in India, forget about beef. Cows are sacred.

In Russia, no surprise, red herring is a favorite ingredient although President Boris Yeltsin dined on pies delivered by the Moscow Pizza Hut when he fought off the power usurpers in the coup attempt of 1991, presumably with more familiar garnishments as he held onto his democratic government.

All this information is provided by the National Association of Pizza Operators, with headquarters in New Albany, Ind. The association also says that such ``gourmet'' toppings as oysters, crayfish, dandelions, sprouts and eggplant are gaining ground in the United States.

Some chefs have even tried pizza with peanut butter and jelly, as well as mashed potatoes and bacon and eggs, says an association fact sheet.

``Pizza is emerging as a dessert, as a breakfast entree,'' boasts Gerry Durnell, director of the pizza operators group and editor of Pizza Today magazine. ``They all fall under the umbrella and we don't discriminate.''

Some more recent trends include drive-through restaurants, buffet lines and pies offered by the slice.

Despite the inroads made by gourmet pies, a California innovation, pepperoni is America's favorite topping, the operators association reports. Mushrooms, sausage, green pepper and onion follow. The traditional pizza is a long way from being dethroned.

``There are strong regional preferences,'' Durnell says, adding that Hampton Roads prefers a thin to medium thickness in crusts, with familiar ingredients.

In other words, the chain restaurants like Pizza Hut, Little Caesar's, Domino's andChanello's serve up just what we like.

``The area's taste is conservative,'' says George Poulos, owner of Jimmy's Pizza in the Hilltop area of Virginia Beach. ``I try to keep a local awareness and serve the neighborhood.''

To compete with the chains, he tries to keep his pies inexpensive and doesn't try to lure customers from too far beyond his store.

Poulos began delivering pizzas in 1980, possibly the first local operator to do so after Domino's.

Still, Jimmy's has a few of the newer products - white cheese, Hawaiian flavoring, Greek toppings - because some of his clientele have asked for them.

Another local entrepreneur, Anthony DiSilvestro, goes up against the chains by computerizing his accounts and working 100 hours a week at the Y-Not Pizza in Great Neck Square, Virginia Beach.

``If you want to stay in this business, you've got to do it,'' he insists. He and his wife, Cyndi, moved here from New Jersey and opened their restaurant a year and a half ago.

The Y-Not (``Tony'' spelled backward) specializes is a New York-style pizza: ``It's a thin crust, crispier than the chains, with fresh ingredients and traditional toppings,'' DiSilvestro says. He also says he has imported New York prices, which are lower than the chains.

New York still carries a lofty image in pizza lore. The first American pizzeria, Lombardi's, opened in the Big Apple in 1905. But Chicago also has its ``deep-dish'' pizza tradition. It's spreading across the nation with the chain Pizzeria Uno, which recently opened an outlet at Janaf Shopping Plaza in Norfolk.

``The dough is given extra time to rise,'' explains Mills Kilbourne, manager of the local Pizzeria Uno. ``The pie is filled, not topped.''

But even within the pizza genre, there are variances of opinion. The deep-dish Chicago-style product sold by Cafe 21 on West 21st Street in Norfolk is ``an encased pizza,'' according to John Glenn, a waiter there. ``There's dough on top and bottom with the ingredients inside and sauce on top. It's more like a pie.'' GOURMET STYLE

If Hampton Roads likes mozzarella cheese and pepperoni, there still appears to be ample room for the stuff invading from the West Coast.

Mike Cavish, owner of Fellini's, also on West 21st Street in Norfolk, is a believer. So are the customers who crowd Fellini's foyer every evening, waiting to be seated or to pick up takeout orders. Pizzas on the Fellini's menu include Shrimp Pesto, Cajun, Lime Chicken, Thai and 15 others.

Cavish, who started with eight pizzas six years ago, has since expanded his dining capacity from five tables to 38. He says the gourmet pies ``have revived the pizza industry.''

Fellini's best sellers are the white pizza, made with mozzarella, Fontina, smoked Gouda and Romano cheeses and spinach, and the fresh tomato with basil, garlic and mozzarella.

Cavish stays ahead of the curve by keeping pizza on his brain, even while driving. Sometimes he color-coordinates pizzas. His latest vision, for example, was black: beans, andouille sausage, red and green onions and sour cream. Presto, a Cuban pizza.

Whatever its form, pizza is the nation's favorite restaurant food, with 60,000 outlets dispensing it.

We eat 100 acres of it per day, according to the pizza operators association. Pizzeria growth outpaces overall restaurant growth.

Pizza is now No. 1 among lunch and dinner entrees eaten at home, according to report in the Washington Post. Ten years ago, it was eighth, just behind the bologna sandwich.

It's profitable for the big chains as well as the little entrepreneur. ``It's hard work and long hours,'' says the pizza operators' Durnell. ``But a neat way to see a product from inception to completion.

``It's an inexpensive meal,'' he adds. ``All food groups are represented. It's tasty. In school lunch surveys, kids put it No. 1.

``There are lots of choices today. You can eat it with your hands. It's a fun food, a friendly food.'' ILLUSTRATION: Staff color photos by LAWRENCE JACKSON


ANY WAY YOU SLICE IT WITHG NEW TOPPINGS RANGING FROM THAI TO CAJUN, PIZZA CAN BE JUST ABOUT ANYTHING YOU WANT IT TO BE.

The culinary traditions of Italy and China seem likely to merge atop a pizza crust.

At the spring Pizza Expo in Las Vegas, where thousands of people in the industry gathered, an Oriental stir-fry recipe out of Louisville was named Pizza of the Year.

Soon, this concoction could be delivered to your door.

Pizza does not stand still.

As gastronomic trends, such as Thai and Cajun, roll across America, neighborhood pizzerias and national chains alike offer ethnic and herbal blends on hot sliced pizzas packed in boxes.

Pizza all the way? It's beyond that: It's pizza all the way around the world, and back again.

No longer Italian, no longer American, pizza is global.

In Japan, you can choose squid or eel for toppings. In Pakistan, order a curry pizza, but next door in India, forget about beef. Cows are sacred.

In Russia, no surprise, red herring is a favorite ingredient although President Boris Yeltsin dined on pies delivered by the Moscow Pizza Hut when he fought off the power usurpers in the coup attempt of 1991, presumably with more familiar garnishments as he held onto his democratic government.

All this information is provided by the National Association of Pizza Operators, with headquarters in New Albany, Ind. The association also says that such ``gourmet'' toppings as oysters, crayfish, dandelions, sprouts and eggplant are gaining ground in the United States.

Some chefs have even tried pizza with peanut butter and jelly, as well as mashed potatoes and bacon and eggs, says an association fact sheet.

``Pizza is emerging as a dessert, as a breakfast entree,'' boasts Gerry Durnell, director of the pizza operators group and editor of Pizza Today magazine. ``They all fall under the umbrella and we don't discriminate.''

Some more recent trends include drive-through restaurants, buffet lines and pies offered by the slice.

Despite the inroads made by gourmet pies, a California innovation, pepperoni is America's favorite topping, the operators association reports. Mushrooms, sausage, green pepper and onion follow. The traditional pizza is a long way from being dethroned.

``There are strong regional preferences,'' Durnell says, adding that Hampton Roads prefers a thin to medium thickness in crusts, with familiar ingredients.

In other words, the chain restaurants like Pizza Hut, Little Caesar's, Domino's andChanello's serve up just what we like.

``The area's taste is conservative,'' says George Poulos, owner of Jimmy's Pizza in the Hilltop area of Virginia Beach. ``I try to keep a local awareness and serve the neighborhood.''

To compete with the chains, he tries to keep his pies inexpensive and doesn't try to lure customers from too far beyond his store.

Poulos began delivering pizzas in 1980, possibly the first local operator to do so after Domino's.

Still, Jimmy's has a few of the newer products - white cheese, Hawaiian flavoring, Greek toppings - because some of his clientele have asked for them.

Another local entrepreneur, Anthony DiSilvestro, goes up against the chains by computerizing his accounts and working 100 hours a week at the Y-Not Pizza in Great Neck Square, Virginia Beach.

``If you want to stay in this business, you've got to do it,'' he insists. He and his wife, Cyndi, moved here from New Jersey and opened their restaurant a year and a half ago.

The Y-Not (``Tony'' spelled backward) specializes is a New York-style pizza: ``It's a thin crust, crispier than the chains, with fresh ingredients and traditional toppings,'' DiSilvestro says. He also says he has imported New York prices, which are lower than the chains.

New York still carries a lofty image in pizza lore. The first American pizzeria, Lombardi's, opened in the Big Apple in 1905. But Chicago also has its ``deep-dish'' pizza tradition. It's spreading across the nation with the chain Pizzeria Uno, which recently opened an outlet at Janaf Shopping Plaza in Norfolk.

``The dough is given extra time to rise,'' explains Mills Kilbourne, manager of the local Pizzeria Uno. ``The pie is filled, not topped.''

But even within the pizza genre, there are variances of opinion. The deep-dish Chicago-style product sold by Cafe 21 on West 21st Street in Norfolk is ``an encased pizza,'' according to John Glenn, a waiter there. ``There's dough on top and bottom with the ingredients inside and sauce on top. It's more like a pie.'' GOURMET STYLE

If Hampton Roads likes mozzarella cheese and pepperoni, there still appears to be ample room for the stuff invading from the West Coast.

Mike Cavish, owner of Fellini's, also on West 21st Street in Norfolk, is a believer. So are the customers who crowd Fellini's foyer every evening, waiting to be seated or to pick up takeout orders. Pizzas on the Fellini's menu include Shrimp Pesto, Cajun, Lime Chicken, Thai and 15 others.

Cavish, who started with eight pizzas six years ago, has since expanded his dining capacity from five tables to 38. He says the gourmet pies ``have revived the pizza industry.''

Fellini's best sellers are the white pizza, made with mozzarella, Fontina, smoked Gouda and Romano cheeses and spinach, and the fresh tomato with basil, garlic and mozzarella.

Cavish stays ahead of the curve by keeping pizza on his brain, even while driving. Sometimes he color-coordinates pizzas. His latest vision, for example, was black: beans, andouille sausage, red and green onions and sour cream. Presto, a Cuban pizza.

Whatever its form, pizza is the nation's favorite restaurant food, with 60,000 outlets dispensing it.

We eat 100 acres of it per day, according to the pizza operators association. Pizzeria growth outpaces overall restaurant growth.

Pizza is now No. 1 among lunch and dinner entrees eaten at home, according to report in the Washington Post. Ten years ago, it was eighth, just behind the bologna sandwich.

It's profitable for the big chains as well as the little entrepreneur. ``It's hard work and long hours,'' says the pizza operators' Durnell. ``But a neat way to see a product from inception to completion.

``It's an inexpensive meal,'' he adds. ``All food groups are represented. It's tasty. In school lunch surveys, kids put it No. 1.

``There are lots of choices today. You can eat it with your hands. It's a fun food, a friendly food.'' ILLUSTRATION: Staff color photos by LAWRENCE JACKSON


ANY WAY YOU SLICE IT WITHG NEW TOPPINGS RANGING FROM THAI TO CAJUN, PIZZA CAN BE JUST ABOUT ANYTHING YOU WANT IT TO BE.

The culinary traditions of Italy and China seem likely to merge atop a pizza crust.

At the spring Pizza Expo in Las Vegas, where thousands of people in the industry gathered, an Oriental stir-fry recipe out of Louisville was named Pizza of the Year.

Soon, this concoction could be delivered to your door.

Pizza does not stand still.

As gastronomic trends, such as Thai and Cajun, roll across America, neighborhood pizzerias and national chains alike offer ethnic and herbal blends on hot sliced pizzas packed in boxes.

Pizza all the way? It's beyond that: It's pizza all the way around the world, and back again.

No longer Italian, no longer American, pizza is global.

In Japan, you can choose squid or eel for toppings. In Pakistan, order a curry pizza, but next door in India, forget about beef. Cows are sacred.

In Russia, no surprise, red herring is a favorite ingredient although President Boris Yeltsin dined on pies delivered by the Moscow Pizza Hut when he fought off the power usurpers in the coup attempt of 1991, presumably with more familiar garnishments as he held onto his democratic government.

All this information is provided by the National Association of Pizza Operators, with headquarters in New Albany, Ind. The association also says that such ``gourmet'' toppings as oysters, crayfish, dandelions, sprouts and eggplant are gaining ground in the United States.

Some chefs have even tried pizza with peanut butter and jelly, as well as mashed potatoes and bacon and eggs, says an association fact sheet.

``Pizza is emerging as a dessert, as a breakfast entree,'' boasts Gerry Durnell, director of the pizza operators group and editor of Pizza Today magazine. ``They all fall under the umbrella and we don't discriminate.''

Some more recent trends include drive-through restaurants, buffet lines and pies offered by the slice.

Despite the inroads made by gourmet pies, a California innovation, pepperoni is America's favorite topping, the operators association reports. Mushrooms, sausage, green pepper and onion follow. The traditional pizza is a long way from being dethroned.

``There are strong regional preferences,'' Durnell says, adding that Hampton Roads prefers a thin to medium thickness in crusts, with familiar ingredients.

In other words, the chain restaurants like Pizza Hut, Little Caesar's, Domino's andChanello's serve up just what we like.

``The area's taste is conservative,'' says George Poulos, owner of Jimmy's Pizza in the Hilltop area of Virginia Beach. ``I try to keep a local awareness and serve the neighborhood.''

To compete with the chains, he tries to keep his pies inexpensive and doesn't try to lure customers from too far beyond his store.

Poulos began delivering pizzas in 1980, possibly the first local operator to do so after Domino's.

Still, Jimmy's has a few of the newer products - white cheese, Hawaiian flavoring, Greek toppings - because some of his clientele have asked for them.

Another local entrepreneur, Anthony DiSilvestro, goes up against the chains by computerizing his accounts and working 100 hours a week at the Y-Not Pizza in Great Neck Square, Virginia Beach.

``If you want to stay in this business, you've got to do it,'' he insists. He and his wife, Cyndi, moved here from New Jersey and opened their restaurant a year and a half ago.

The Y-Not (``Tony'' spelled backward) specializes is a New York-style pizza: ``It's a thin crust, crispier than the chains, with fresh ingredients and traditional toppings,'' DiSilvestro says. He also says he has imported New York prices, which are lower than the chains.

New York still carries a lofty image in pizza lore. The first American pizzeria, Lombardi's, opened in the Big Apple in 1905. But Chicago also has its ``deep-dish'' pizza tradition. It's spreading across the nation with the chain Pizzeria Uno, which recently opened an outlet at Janaf Shopping Plaza in Norfolk.

``The dough is given extra time to rise,'' explains Mills Kilbourne, manager of the local Pizzeria Uno. ``The pie is filled, not topped.''

But even within the pizza genre, there are variances of opinion. The deep-dish Chicago-style product sold by Cafe 21 on West 21st Street in Norfolk is ``an encased pizza,'' according to John Glenn, a waiter there. ``There's dough on top and bottom with the ingredients inside and sauce on top. It's more like a pie.'' GOURMET STYLE

If Hampton Roads likes mozzarella cheese and pepperoni, there still appears to be ample room for the stuff invading from the West Coast.

Mike Cavish, owner of Fellini's, also on West 21st Street in Norfolk, is a believer. So are the customers who crowd Fellini's foyer every evening, waiting to be seated or to pick up takeout orders. Pizzas on the Fellini's menu include Shrimp Pesto, Cajun, Lime Chicken, Thai and 15 others.

Cavish, who started with eight pizzas six years ago, has since expanded his dining capacity from five tables to 38. He says the gourmet pies ``have revived the pizza industry.''

Fellini's best sellers are the white pizza, made with mozzarella, Fontina, smoked Gouda and Romano cheeses and spinach, and the fresh tomato with basil, garlic and mozzarella.

Cavish stays ahead of the curve by keeping pizza on his brain, even while driving. Sometimes he color-coordinates pizzas. His latest vision, for example, was black: beans, andouille sausage, red and green onions and sour cream. Presto, a Cuban pizza.

Whatever its form, pizza is the nation's favorite restaurant food, with 60,000 outlets dispensing it.

We eat 100 acres of it per day, according to the pizza operators association. Pizzeria growth outpaces overall restaurant growth.

Pizza is now No. 1 among lunch and dinner entrees eaten at home, according to report in the Washington Post. Ten years ago, it was eighth, just behind the bologna sandwich.

It's profitable for the big chains as well as the little entrepreneur. ``It's hard work and long hours,'' says the pizza operators' Durnell. ``But a neat way to see a product from inception to completion.

``It's an inexpensive meal,'' he adds. ``All food groups are represented. It's tasty. In school lunch surveys, kids put it No. 1.

``There are lots of choices today. You can eat it with your hands. It's a fun food, a friendly food.'' ILLUSTRATION: Staff color photos by LAWRENCE JACKSON


ANY WAY YOU SLICE IT WITHG NEW TOPPINGS RANGING FROM THAI TO CAJUN, PIZZA CAN BE JUST ABOUT ANYTHING YOU WANT IT TO BE.

The culinary traditions of Italy and China seem likely to merge atop a pizza crust.

At the spring Pizza Expo in Las Vegas, where thousands of people in the industry gathered, an Oriental stir-fry recipe out of Louisville was named Pizza of the Year.

Soon, this concoction could be delivered to your door.

Pizza does not stand still.

As gastronomic trends, such as Thai and Cajun, roll across America, neighborhood pizzerias and national chains alike offer ethnic and herbal blends on hot sliced pizzas packed in boxes.

Pizza all the way? It's beyond that: It's pizza all the way around the world, and back again.

No longer Italian, no longer American, pizza is global.

In Japan, you can choose squid or eel for toppings. In Pakistan, order a curry pizza, but next door in India, forget about beef. Cows are sacred.

In Russia, no surprise, red herring is a favorite ingredient although President Boris Yeltsin dined on pies delivered by the Moscow Pizza Hut when he fought off the power usurpers in the coup attempt of 1991, presumably with more familiar garnishments as he held onto his democratic government.

All this information is provided by the National Association of Pizza Operators, with headquarters in New Albany, Ind. The association also says that such ``gourmet'' toppings as oysters, crayfish, dandelions, sprouts and eggplant are gaining ground in the United States.

Some chefs have even tried pizza with peanut butter and jelly, as well as mashed potatoes and bacon and eggs, says an association fact sheet.

``Pizza is emerging as a dessert, as a breakfast entree,'' boasts Gerry Durnell, director of the pizza operators group and editor of Pizza Today magazine. ``They all fall under the umbrella and we don't discriminate.''

Some more recent trends include drive-through restaurants, buffet lines and pies offered by the slice.

Despite the inroads made by gourmet pies, a California innovation, pepperoni is America's favorite topping, the operators association reports. Mushrooms, sausage, green pepper and onion follow. The traditional pizza is a long way from being dethroned.

``There are strong regional preferences,'' Durnell says, adding that Hampton Roads prefers a thin to medium thickness in crusts, with familiar ingredients.

In other words, the chain restaurants like Pizza Hut, Little Caesar's, Domino's andChanello's serve up just what we like.

``The area's taste is conservative,'' says George Poulos, owner of Jimmy's Pizza in the Hilltop area of Virginia Beach. ``I try to keep a local awareness and serve the neighborhood.''

To compete with the chains, he tries to keep his pies inexpensive and doesn't try to lure customers from too far beyond his store.

Poulos began delivering pizzas in 1980, possibly the first local operator to do so after Domino's.

Still, Jimmy's has a few of the newer products - white cheese, Hawaiian flavoring, Greek toppings - because some of his clientele have asked for them.

Another local entrepreneur, Anthony DiSilvestro, goes up against the chains by computerizing his accounts and working 100 hours a week at the Y-Not Pizza in Great Neck Square, Virginia Beach.

``If you want to stay in this business, you've got to do it,'' he insists. He and his wife, Cyndi, moved here from New Jersey and opened their restaurant a year and a half ago.

The Y-Not (``Tony'' spelled backward) specializes is a New York-style pizza: ``It's a thin crust, crispier than the chains, with fresh ingredients and traditional toppings,'' DiSilvestro says. He also says he has imported New York prices, which are lower than the chains.

New York still carries a lofty image in pizza lore. The first American pizzeria, Lombardi's, opened in the Big Apple in 1905. But Chicago also has its ``deep-dish'' pizza tradition. It's spreading across the nation with the chain Pizzeria Uno, which recently opened an outlet at Janaf Shopping Plaza in Norfolk.

``The dough is given extra time to rise,'' explains Mills Kilbourne, manager of the local Pizzeria Uno. ``The pie is filled, not topped.''

But even within the pizza genre, there are variances of opinion. The deep-dish Chicago-style product sold by Cafe 21 on West 21st Street in Norfolk is ``an encased pizza,'' according to John Glenn, a waiter there. ``There's dough on top and bottom with the ingredients inside and sauce on top. It's more like a pie.'' GOURMET STYLE

If Hampton Roads likes mozzarella cheese and pepperoni, there still appears to be ample room for the stuff invading from the West Coast.

Mike Cavish, owner of Fellini's, also on West 21st Street in Norfolk, is a believer. So are the customers who crowd Fellini's foyer every evening, waiting to be seated or to pick up takeout orders. Pizzas on the Fellini's menu include Shrimp Pesto, Cajun, Lime Chicken, Thai and 15 others.

Cavish, who started with eight pizzas six years ago, has since expanded his dining capacity from five tables to 38. He says the gourmet pies ``have revived the pizza industry.''

Fellini's best sellers are the white pizza, made with mozzarella, Fontina, smoked Gouda and Romano cheeses and spinach, and the fresh tomato with basil, garlic and mozzarella.

Cavish stays ahead of the curve by keeping pizza on his brain, even while driving. Sometimes he color-coordinates pizzas. His latest vision, for example, was black: beans, andouille sausage, red and green onions and sour cream. Presto, a Cuban pizza.

Whatever its form, pizza is the nation's favorite restaurant food, with 60,000 outlets dispensing it.

We eat 100 acres of it per day, according to the pizza operators association. Pizzeria growth outpaces overall restaurant growth.

Pizza is now No. 1 among lunch and dinner entrees eaten at home, according to report in the Washington Post. Ten years ago, it was eighth, just behind the bologna sandwich.

It's profitable for the big chains as well as the little entrepreneur. ``It's hard work and long hours,'' says the pizza operators' Durnell. ``But a neat way to see a product from inception to completion.

``It's an inexpensive meal,'' he adds. ``All food groups are represented. It's tasty. In school lunch surveys, kids put it No. 1.

``There are lots of choices today. You can eat it with your hands. It's a fun food, a friendly food.'' ILLUSTRATION: Staff color photos by LAWRENCE JACKSON


ANY WAY YOU SLICE IT WITHG NEW TOPPINGS RANGING FROM THAI TO CAJUN, PIZZA CAN BE JUST ABOUT ANYTHING YOU WANT IT TO BE.

The culinary traditions of Italy and China seem likely to merge atop a pizza crust.

At the spring Pizza Expo in Las Vegas, where thousands of people in the industry gathered, an Oriental stir-fry recipe out of Louisville was named Pizza of the Year.

Soon, this concoction could be delivered to your door.

Pizza does not stand still.

As gastronomic trends, such as Thai and Cajun, roll across America, neighborhood pizzerias and national chains alike offer ethnic and herbal blends on hot sliced pizzas packed in boxes.

Pizza all the way? It's beyond that: It's pizza all the way around the world, and back again.

No longer Italian, no longer American, pizza is global.

In Japan, you can choose squid or eel for toppings. In Pakistan, order a curry pizza, but next door in India, forget about beef. Cows are sacred.

In Russia, no surprise, red herring is a favorite ingredient although President Boris Yeltsin dined on pies delivered by the Moscow Pizza Hut when he fought off the power usurpers in the coup attempt of 1991, presumably with more familiar garnishments as he held onto his democratic government.

All this information is provided by the National Association of Pizza Operators, with headquarters in New Albany, Ind. The association also says that such ``gourmet'' toppings as oysters, crayfish, dandelions, sprouts and eggplant are gaining ground in the United States.

Some chefs have even tried pizza with peanut butter and jelly, as well as mashed potatoes and bacon and eggs, says an association fact sheet.

``Pizza is emerging as a dessert, as a breakfast entree,'' boasts Gerry Durnell, director of the pizza operators group and editor of Pizza Today magazine. ``They all fall under the umbrella and we don't discriminate.''

Some more recent trends include drive-through restaurants, buffet lines and pies offered by the slice.

Despite the inroads made by gourmet pies, a California innovation, pepperoni is America's favorite topping, the operators association reports. Mushrooms, sausage, green pepper and onion follow. The traditional pizza is a long way from being dethroned.

``There are strong regional preferences,'' Durnell says, adding that Hampton Roads prefers a thin to medium thickness in crusts, with familiar ingredients.

In other words, the chain restaurants like Pizza Hut, Little Caesar's, Domino's andChanello's serve up just what we like.

``The area's taste is conservative,'' says George Poulos, owner of Jimmy's Pizza in the Hilltop area of Virginia Beach. ``I try to keep a local awareness and serve the neighborhood.''

To compete with the chains, he tries to keep his pies inexpensive and doesn't try to lure customers from too far beyond his store.

Poulos began delivering pizzas in 1980, possibly the first local operator to do so after Domino's.

Still, Jimmy's has a few of the newer products - white cheese, Hawaiian flavoring, Greek toppings - because some of his clientele have asked for them.

Another local entrepreneur, Anthony DiSilvestro, goes up against the chains by computerizing his accounts and working 100 hours a week at the Y-Not Pizza in Great Neck Square, Virginia Beach.

``If you want to stay in this business, you've got to do it,'' he insists. He and his wife, Cyndi, moved here from New Jersey and opened their restaurant a year and a half ago.

The Y-Not (``Tony'' spelled backward) specializes is a New York-style pizza: ``It's a thin crust, crispier than the chains, with fresh ingredients and traditional toppings,'' DiSilvestro says. He also says he has imported New York prices, which are lower than the chains.

New York still carries a lofty image in pizza lore. The first American pizzeria, Lombardi's, opened in the Big Apple in 1905. But Chicago also has its ``deep-dish'' pizza tradition. It's spreading across the nation with the chain Pizzeria Uno, which recently opened an outlet at Janaf Shopping Plaza in Norfolk.

``The dough is given extra time to rise,'' explains Mills Kilbourne, manager of the local Pizzeria Uno. ``The pie is filled, not topped.''

But even within the pizza genre, there are variances of opinion. The deep-dish Chicago-style product sold by Cafe 21 on West 21st Street in Norfolk is ``an encased pizza,'' according to John Glenn, a waiter there. ``There's dough on top and bottom with the ingredients inside and sauce on top. It's more like a pie.'' GOURMET STYLE

If Hampton Roads likes mozzarella cheese and pepperoni, there still appears to be ample room for the stuff invading from the West Coast.

Mike Cavish, owner of Fellini's, also on West 21st Street in Norfolk, is a believer. So are the customers who crowd Fellini's foyer every evening, waiting to be seated or to pick up takeout orders. Pizzas on the Fellini's menu include Shrimp Pesto, Cajun, Lime Chicken, Thai and 15 others.

Cavish, who started with eight pizzas six years ago, has since expanded his dining capacity from five tables to 38. He says the gourmet pies ``have revived the pizza industry.''

Fellini's best sellers are the white pizza, made with mozzarella, Fontina, smoked Gouda and Romano cheeses and spinach, and the fresh tomato with basil, garlic and mozzarella.

Cavish stays ahead of the curve by keeping pizza on his brain, even while driving. Sometimes he color-coordinates pizzas. His latest vision, for example, was black: beans, andouille sausage, red and green onions and sour cream. Presto, a Cuban pizza.

Whatever its form, pizza is the nation's favorite restaurant food, with 60,000 outlets dispensing it.

We eat 100 acres of it per day, according to the pizza operators association. Pizzeria growth outpaces overall restaurant growth.

Pizza is now No. 1 among lunch and dinner entrees eaten at home, according to report in the Washington Post. Ten years ago, it was eighth, just behind the bologna sandwich.

It's profitable for the big chains as well as the little entrepreneur. ``It's hard work and long hours,'' says the pizza operators' Durnell. ``But a neat way to see a product from inception to completion.

``It's an inexpensive meal,'' he adds. ``All food groups are represented. It's tasty. In school lunch surveys, kids put it No. 1.

``There are lots of choices today. You can eat it with your hands. It's a fun food, a friendly food.'' ILLUSTRATION: Staff color photos by LAWRENCE JACKSON


ANY WAY YOU SLICE IT WITHG NEW TOPPINGS RANGING FROM THAI TO CAJUN, PIZZA CAN BE JUST ABOUT ANYTHING YOU WANT IT TO BE.

The culinary traditions of Italy and China seem likely to merge atop a pizza crust.

At the spring Pizza Expo in Las Vegas, where thousands of people in the industry gathered, an Oriental stir-fry recipe out of Louisville was named Pizza of the Year.

Soon, this concoction could be delivered to your door.

Pizza does not stand still.

As gastronomic trends, such as Thai and Cajun, roll across America, neighborhood pizzerias and national chains alike offer ethnic and herbal blends on hot sliced pizzas packed in boxes.

Pizza all the way? It's beyond that: It's pizza all the way around the world, and back again.

No longer Italian, no longer American, pizza is global.

In Japan, you can choose squid or eel for toppings. In Pakistan, order a curry pizza, but next door in India, forget about beef. Cows are sacred.

In Russia, no surprise, red herring is a favorite ingredient although President Boris Yeltsin dined on pies delivered by the Moscow Pizza Hut when he fought off the power usurpers in the coup attempt of 1991, presumably with more familiar garnishments as he held onto his democratic government.

All this information is provided by the National Association of Pizza Operators, with headquarters in New Albany, Ind. The association also says that such ``gourmet'' toppings as oysters, crayfish, dandelions, sprouts and eggplant are gaining ground in the United States.

Some chefs have even tried pizza with peanut butter and jelly, as well as mashed potatoes and bacon and eggs, says an association fact sheet.

``Pizza is emerging as a dessert, as a breakfast entree,'' boasts Gerry Durnell, director of the pizza operators group and editor of Pizza Today magazine. ``They all fall under the umbrella and we don't discriminate.''

Some more recent trends include drive-through restaurants, buffet lines and pies offered by the slice.

Despite the inroads made by gourmet pies, a California innovation, pepperoni is America's favorite topping, the operators association reports. Mushrooms, sausage, green pepper and onion follow. The traditional pizza is a long way from being dethroned.

``There are strong regional preferences,'' Durnell says, adding that Hampton Roads prefers a thin to medium thickness in crusts, with familiar ingredients.

In other words, the chain restaurants like Pizza Hut, Little Caesar's, Domino's andChanello's serve up just what we like.

``The area's taste is conservative,'' says George Poulos, owner of Jimmy's Pizza in the Hilltop area of Virginia Beach. ``I try to keep a local awareness and serve the neighborhood.''

To compete with the chains, he tries to keep his pies inexpensive and doesn't try to lure customers from too far beyond his store.

Poulos began delivering pizzas in 1980, possibly the first local operator to do so after Domino's.

Still, Jimmy's has a few of the newer products - white cheese, Hawaiian flavoring, Greek toppings - because some of his clientele have asked for them.

Another local entrepreneur, Anthony DiSilvestro, goes up against the chains by computerizing his accounts and working 100 hours a week at the Y-Not Pizza in Great Neck Square, Virginia Beach.

``If you want to stay in this business, you've got to do it,'' he insists. He and his wife, Cyndi, moved here from New Jersey and opened their restaurant a year and a half ago.

The Y-Not (``Tony'' spelled backward) specializes is a New York-style pizza: ``It's a thin crust, crispier than the chains, with fresh ingredients and traditional toppings,'' DiSilvestro says. He also says he has imported New York prices, which are lower than the chains.

New York still carries a lofty image in pizza lore. The first American pizzeria, Lombardi's, opened in the Big Apple in 1905. But Chicago also has its ``deep-dish'' pizza tradition. It's spreading across the nation with the chain Pizzeria Uno, which recently opened an outlet at Janaf Shopping Plaza in Norfolk.

``The dough is given extra time to rise,'' explains Mills Kilbourne, manager of the local Pizzeria Uno. ``The pie is filled, not topped.''

But even within the pizza genre, there are variances of opinion. The deep-dish Chicago-style product sold by Cafe 21 on West 21st Street in Norfolk is ``an encased pizza,'' according to John Glenn, a waiter there. ``There's dough on top and bottom with the ingredients inside and sauce on top. It's more like a pie.'' GOURMET STYLE

If Hampton Roads likes mozzarella cheese and pepperoni, there still appears to be ample room for the stuff invading from the West Coast.

Mike Cavish, owner of Fellini's, also on West 21st Street in Norfolk, is a believer. So are the customers who crowd Fellini's foyer every evening, waiting to be seated or to pick up takeout orders. Pizzas on the Fellini's menu include Shrimp Pesto, Cajun, Lime Chicken, Thai and 15 others.

Cavish, who started with eight pizzas six years ago, has since expanded his dining capacity from five tables to 38. He says the gourmet pies ``have revived the pizza industry.''

Fellini's best sellers are the white pizza, made with mozzarella, Fontina, smoked Gouda and Romano cheeses and spinach, and the fresh tomato with basil, garlic and mozzarella.

Cavish stays ahead of the curve by keeping pizza on his brain, even while driving. Sometimes he color-coordinates pizzas. His latest vision, for example, was black: beans, andouille sausage, red and green onions and sour cream. Presto, a Cuban pizza.

Whatever its form, pizza is the nation's favorite restaurant food, with 60,000 outlets dispensing it.

We eat 100 acres of it per day, according to the pizza operators association. Pizzeria growth outpaces overall restaurant growth.

Pizza is now No. 1 among lunch and dinner entrees eaten at home, according to report in the Washington Post. Ten years ago, it was eighth, just behind the bologna sandwich.

It's profitable for the big chains as well as the little entrepreneur. ``It's hard work and long hours,'' says the pizza operators' Durnell. ``But a neat way to see a product from inception to completion.

``It's an inexpensive meal,'' he adds. ``All food groups are represented. It's tasty. In school lunch surveys, kids put it No. 1.

``There are lots of choices today. You can eat it with your hands. It's a fun food, a friendly food.'' ILLUSTRATION: Staff color photos by LAWRENCE JACKSON


ANY WAY YOU SLICE IT WITHG NEW TOPPINGS RANGING FROM THAI TO CAJUN, PIZZA CAN BE JUST ABOUT ANYTHING YOU WANT IT TO BE.

The culinary traditions of Italy and China seem likely to merge atop a pizza crust.

At the spring Pizza Expo in Las Vegas, where thousands of people in the industry gathered, an Oriental stir-fry recipe out of Louisville was named Pizza of the Year.

Soon, this concoction could be delivered to your door.

Pizza does not stand still.

As gastronomic trends, such as Thai and Cajun, roll across America, neighborhood pizzerias and national chains alike offer ethnic and herbal blends on hot sliced pizzas packed in boxes.

Pizza all the way? It's beyond that: It's pizza all the way around the world, and back again.

No longer Italian, no longer American, pizza is global.

In Japan, you can choose squid or eel for toppings. In Pakistan, order a curry pizza, but next door in India, forget about beef. Cows are sacred.

In Russia, no surprise, red herring is a favorite ingredient although President Boris Yeltsin dined on pies delivered by the Moscow Pizza Hut when he fought off the power usurpers in the coup attempt of 1991, presumably with more familiar garnishments as he held onto his democratic government.

All this information is provided by the National Association of Pizza Operators, with headquarters in New Albany, Ind. The association also says that such ``gourmet'' toppings as oysters, crayfish, dandelions, sprouts and eggplant are gaining ground in the United States.

Some chefs have even tried pizza with peanut butter and jelly, as well as mashed potatoes and bacon and eggs, says an association fact sheet.

``Pizza is emerging as a dessert, as a breakfast entree,'' boasts Gerry Durnell, director of the pizza operators group and editor of Pizza Today magazine. ``They all fall under the umbrella and we don't discriminate.''

Some more recent trends include drive-through restaurants, buffet lines and pies offered by the slice.

Despite the inroads made by gourmet pies, a California innovation, pepperoni is America's favorite topping, the operators association reports. Mushrooms, sausage, green pepper and onion follow. The traditional pizza is a long way from being dethroned.

``There are strong regional preferences,'' Durnell says, adding that Hampton Roads prefers a thin to medium thickness in crusts, with familiar ingredients.

In other words, the chain restaurants like Pizza Hut, Little Caesar's, Domino's andChanello's serve up just what we like.

``The area's taste is conservative,'' says George Poulos, owner of Jimmy's Pizza in the Hilltop area of Virginia Beach. ``I try to keep a local awareness and serve the neighborhood.''

To compete with the chains, he tries to keep his pies inexpensive and doesn't try to lure customers from too far beyond his store.

Poulos began delivering pizzas in 1980, possibly the first local operator to do so after Domino's.

Still, Jimmy's has a few of the newer products - white cheese, Hawaiian flavoring, Greek toppings - because some of his clientele have asked for them.

Another local entrepreneur, Anthony DiSilvestro, goes up against the chains by computerizing his accounts and working 100 hours a week at the Y-Not Pizza in Great Neck Square, Virginia Beach.

``If you want to stay in this business, you've got to do it,'' he insists. He and his wife, Cyndi, moved here from New Jersey and opened their restaurant a year and a half ago.

The Y-Not (``Tony'' spelled backward) specializes is a New York-style pizza: ``It's a thin crust, crispier than the chains, with fresh ingredients and traditional toppings,'' DiSilvestro says. He also says he has imported New York prices, which are lower than the chains.

New York still carries a lofty image in pizza lore. The first American pizzeria, Lombardi's, opened in the Big Apple in 1905. But Chicago also has its ``deep-dish'' pizza tradition. It's spreading across the nation with the chain Pizzeria Uno, which recently opened an outlet at Janaf Shopping Plaza in Norfolk.

``The dough is given extra time to rise,'' explains Mills Kilbourne, manager of the local Pizzeria Uno. ``The pie is filled, not topped.''

But even within the pizza genre, there are variances of opinion. The deep-dish Chicago-style product sold by Cafe 21 on West 21st Street in Norfolk is ``an encased pizza,'' according to John Glenn, a waiter there. ``There's dough on top and bottom with the ingredients inside and sauce on top. It's more like a pie.'' GOURMET STYLE

If Hampton Roads likes mozzarella cheese and pepperoni, there still appears to be ample room for the stuff invading from the West Coast.

Mike Cavish, owner of Fellini's, also on West 21st Street in Norfolk, is a believer. So are the customers who crowd Fellini's foyer every evening, waiting to be seated or to pick up takeout orders. Pizzas on the Fellini's menu include Shrimp Pesto, Cajun, Lime Chicken, Thai and 15 others.

Cavish, who started with eight pizzas six years ago, has since expanded his dining capacity from five tables to 38. He says the gourmet pies ``have revived the pizza industry.''

Fellini's best sellers are the white pizza, made with mozzarella, Fontina, smoked Gouda and Romano cheeses and spinach, and the fresh tomato with basil, garlic and mozzarella.

Cavish stays ahead of the curve by keeping pizza on his brain, even while driving. Sometimes he color-coordinates pizzas. His latest vision, for example, was black: beans, andouille sausage, red and green onions and sour cream. Presto, a Cuban pizza.

Whatever its form, pizza is the nation's favorite restaurant food, with 60,000 outlets dispensing it.

We eat 100 acres of it per day, according to the pizza operators association. Pizzeria growth outpaces overall restaurant growth.

Pizza is now No. 1 among lunch and dinner entrees eaten at home, according to report in the Washington Post. Ten years ago, it was eighth, just behind the bologna sandwich.

It's profitable for the big chains as well as the little entrepreneur. ``It's hard work and long hours,'' says the pizza operators' Durnell. ``But a neat way to see a product from inception to completion.

``It's an inexpensive meal,'' he adds. ``All food groups are represented. It's tasty. In school lunch surveys, kids put it No. 1.

``There are lots of choices today. You can eat it with your hands. It's a fun food, a friendly food.'' ILLUSTRATION: Staff color photos by LAWRENCE JACKSON


Watch the video: Cone Crust Pizza: Reshaping Tasty Fun!


Comments:

  1. Gardashura

    Just dare to do this once again!

  2. Irving

    You are not right. I'm sure. I invite you to discuss. Write in PM, we will talk.

  3. Mozshura

    as it turned out not in vain =)

  4. Auriville

    it is impossible to argue infinitely

  5. Braktilar

    You must say you are wrong.

  6. Daibhidh

    Tell me who can I ask?



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