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Chicago Hot Dog Chain Portillo’s Credited with Helping Woman Live to 100

Chicago Hot Dog Chain Portillo’s Credited with Helping Woman Live to 100


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A woman who lived to 100 told a reporter during her last birthday party that Portillo’s was the secret to her long life

Helen Diekman ate at her local Portillo’s up to three times a week, and lived to be 100.

Helen Diekman, a longtime resident of Elgin, Illinois, died last week — but not before turning a full hundred years old.

The key to her long and healthy life, Diekman often said, was eating at Portillo’s, the popular Chicago-based restaurant chain whose iconic Chicago-style hot dog ranks among The Daily Meal’s list of America’s 75 Best Hot Dogs.

In 2013, the centenarian-to-be even met Dick Portillo, the founder of the restaurant once known as “The Dog House,” at the grand opening of the chain’s Elgin location. A photo of the two was kept next to Diekman’s bedside, according to the Chicago Daily Herald. Since then, Diekman stopped by for lunch as often as three times a week, always ordering the same thing — a hot dog with everything except hot peppers, fries, and a Diet Coke.

Diekman’s 100th birthday, which took place three weeks ago, was even held at Portillo’s. When asked to share the secret of her longevity, Diekman told a reporter “Portillo’s” was the answer, plus “I go to bed early and I eat good.”


Hot dog

A hot dog [1] [2] (less commonly spelled hotdog [3] ) is a food consisting of a grilled or steamed sausage served in the slit of a partially sliced bun, [4] and much debate has centered around whether or not it can be considered a sandwich the term can also refer to the sausage itself. The sausage used is a wiener (Vienna sausage) or a frankfurter (Frankfurter Würstchen, also just called frank). The names of these sausages also commonly refer to their assembled dish. [5] Hot dog preparation and condiments vary worldwide. Typical condiments include mustard, ketchup, mayonnaise, relish, and cheese sauce, [ citation needed ] and common garnishes include onions, sauerkraut, jalapeños, chili, grated cheese, coleslaw, bacon, and olives. [ citation needed ] Hot dog variants include the corn dog and pigs in a blanket. The hot dog's cultural traditions include the Nathan's Hot Dog Eating Contest and the Oscar Mayer Wienermobile.

These types of sausages were culturally imported from Germany and became popular in the United States. It became a working-class street food in the U.S., sold at stands and carts. The hot dog became closely associated with baseball and American culture. Although particularly connected with New York City and its cuisine, the hot dog eventually became ubiquitous throughout the US during the 20th century. Its preparation varies regionally in the country, emerging as an important part of other regional cuisines, including Chicago street cuisine. [6] [7] [8]


Hot dog

A hot dog [1] [2] (less commonly spelled hotdog [3] ) is a food consisting of a grilled or steamed sausage served in the slit of a partially sliced bun, [4] and much debate has centered around whether or not it can be considered a sandwich the term can also refer to the sausage itself. The sausage used is a wiener (Vienna sausage) or a frankfurter (Frankfurter Würstchen, also just called frank). The names of these sausages also commonly refer to their assembled dish. [5] Hot dog preparation and condiments vary worldwide. Typical condiments include mustard, ketchup, mayonnaise, relish, and cheese sauce, [ citation needed ] and common garnishes include onions, sauerkraut, jalapeños, chili, grated cheese, coleslaw, bacon, and olives. [ citation needed ] Hot dog variants include the corn dog and pigs in a blanket. The hot dog's cultural traditions include the Nathan's Hot Dog Eating Contest and the Oscar Mayer Wienermobile.

These types of sausages were culturally imported from Germany and became popular in the United States. It became a working-class street food in the U.S., sold at stands and carts. The hot dog became closely associated with baseball and American culture. Although particularly connected with New York City and its cuisine, the hot dog eventually became ubiquitous throughout the US during the 20th century. Its preparation varies regionally in the country, emerging as an important part of other regional cuisines, including Chicago street cuisine. [6] [7] [8]


Hot dog

A hot dog [1] [2] (less commonly spelled hotdog [3] ) is a food consisting of a grilled or steamed sausage served in the slit of a partially sliced bun, [4] and much debate has centered around whether or not it can be considered a sandwich the term can also refer to the sausage itself. The sausage used is a wiener (Vienna sausage) or a frankfurter (Frankfurter Würstchen, also just called frank). The names of these sausages also commonly refer to their assembled dish. [5] Hot dog preparation and condiments vary worldwide. Typical condiments include mustard, ketchup, mayonnaise, relish, and cheese sauce, [ citation needed ] and common garnishes include onions, sauerkraut, jalapeños, chili, grated cheese, coleslaw, bacon, and olives. [ citation needed ] Hot dog variants include the corn dog and pigs in a blanket. The hot dog's cultural traditions include the Nathan's Hot Dog Eating Contest and the Oscar Mayer Wienermobile.

These types of sausages were culturally imported from Germany and became popular in the United States. It became a working-class street food in the U.S., sold at stands and carts. The hot dog became closely associated with baseball and American culture. Although particularly connected with New York City and its cuisine, the hot dog eventually became ubiquitous throughout the US during the 20th century. Its preparation varies regionally in the country, emerging as an important part of other regional cuisines, including Chicago street cuisine. [6] [7] [8]


Hot dog

A hot dog [1] [2] (less commonly spelled hotdog [3] ) is a food consisting of a grilled or steamed sausage served in the slit of a partially sliced bun, [4] and much debate has centered around whether or not it can be considered a sandwich the term can also refer to the sausage itself. The sausage used is a wiener (Vienna sausage) or a frankfurter (Frankfurter Würstchen, also just called frank). The names of these sausages also commonly refer to their assembled dish. [5] Hot dog preparation and condiments vary worldwide. Typical condiments include mustard, ketchup, mayonnaise, relish, and cheese sauce, [ citation needed ] and common garnishes include onions, sauerkraut, jalapeños, chili, grated cheese, coleslaw, bacon, and olives. [ citation needed ] Hot dog variants include the corn dog and pigs in a blanket. The hot dog's cultural traditions include the Nathan's Hot Dog Eating Contest and the Oscar Mayer Wienermobile.

These types of sausages were culturally imported from Germany and became popular in the United States. It became a working-class street food in the U.S., sold at stands and carts. The hot dog became closely associated with baseball and American culture. Although particularly connected with New York City and its cuisine, the hot dog eventually became ubiquitous throughout the US during the 20th century. Its preparation varies regionally in the country, emerging as an important part of other regional cuisines, including Chicago street cuisine. [6] [7] [8]


Hot dog

A hot dog [1] [2] (less commonly spelled hotdog [3] ) is a food consisting of a grilled or steamed sausage served in the slit of a partially sliced bun, [4] and much debate has centered around whether or not it can be considered a sandwich the term can also refer to the sausage itself. The sausage used is a wiener (Vienna sausage) or a frankfurter (Frankfurter Würstchen, also just called frank). The names of these sausages also commonly refer to their assembled dish. [5] Hot dog preparation and condiments vary worldwide. Typical condiments include mustard, ketchup, mayonnaise, relish, and cheese sauce, [ citation needed ] and common garnishes include onions, sauerkraut, jalapeños, chili, grated cheese, coleslaw, bacon, and olives. [ citation needed ] Hot dog variants include the corn dog and pigs in a blanket. The hot dog's cultural traditions include the Nathan's Hot Dog Eating Contest and the Oscar Mayer Wienermobile.

These types of sausages were culturally imported from Germany and became popular in the United States. It became a working-class street food in the U.S., sold at stands and carts. The hot dog became closely associated with baseball and American culture. Although particularly connected with New York City and its cuisine, the hot dog eventually became ubiquitous throughout the US during the 20th century. Its preparation varies regionally in the country, emerging as an important part of other regional cuisines, including Chicago street cuisine. [6] [7] [8]


Hot dog

A hot dog [1] [2] (less commonly spelled hotdog [3] ) is a food consisting of a grilled or steamed sausage served in the slit of a partially sliced bun, [4] and much debate has centered around whether or not it can be considered a sandwich the term can also refer to the sausage itself. The sausage used is a wiener (Vienna sausage) or a frankfurter (Frankfurter Würstchen, also just called frank). The names of these sausages also commonly refer to their assembled dish. [5] Hot dog preparation and condiments vary worldwide. Typical condiments include mustard, ketchup, mayonnaise, relish, and cheese sauce, [ citation needed ] and common garnishes include onions, sauerkraut, jalapeños, chili, grated cheese, coleslaw, bacon, and olives. [ citation needed ] Hot dog variants include the corn dog and pigs in a blanket. The hot dog's cultural traditions include the Nathan's Hot Dog Eating Contest and the Oscar Mayer Wienermobile.

These types of sausages were culturally imported from Germany and became popular in the United States. It became a working-class street food in the U.S., sold at stands and carts. The hot dog became closely associated with baseball and American culture. Although particularly connected with New York City and its cuisine, the hot dog eventually became ubiquitous throughout the US during the 20th century. Its preparation varies regionally in the country, emerging as an important part of other regional cuisines, including Chicago street cuisine. [6] [7] [8]


Hot dog

A hot dog [1] [2] (less commonly spelled hotdog [3] ) is a food consisting of a grilled or steamed sausage served in the slit of a partially sliced bun, [4] and much debate has centered around whether or not it can be considered a sandwich the term can also refer to the sausage itself. The sausage used is a wiener (Vienna sausage) or a frankfurter (Frankfurter Würstchen, also just called frank). The names of these sausages also commonly refer to their assembled dish. [5] Hot dog preparation and condiments vary worldwide. Typical condiments include mustard, ketchup, mayonnaise, relish, and cheese sauce, [ citation needed ] and common garnishes include onions, sauerkraut, jalapeños, chili, grated cheese, coleslaw, bacon, and olives. [ citation needed ] Hot dog variants include the corn dog and pigs in a blanket. The hot dog's cultural traditions include the Nathan's Hot Dog Eating Contest and the Oscar Mayer Wienermobile.

These types of sausages were culturally imported from Germany and became popular in the United States. It became a working-class street food in the U.S., sold at stands and carts. The hot dog became closely associated with baseball and American culture. Although particularly connected with New York City and its cuisine, the hot dog eventually became ubiquitous throughout the US during the 20th century. Its preparation varies regionally in the country, emerging as an important part of other regional cuisines, including Chicago street cuisine. [6] [7] [8]


Hot dog

A hot dog [1] [2] (less commonly spelled hotdog [3] ) is a food consisting of a grilled or steamed sausage served in the slit of a partially sliced bun, [4] and much debate has centered around whether or not it can be considered a sandwich the term can also refer to the sausage itself. The sausage used is a wiener (Vienna sausage) or a frankfurter (Frankfurter Würstchen, also just called frank). The names of these sausages also commonly refer to their assembled dish. [5] Hot dog preparation and condiments vary worldwide. Typical condiments include mustard, ketchup, mayonnaise, relish, and cheese sauce, [ citation needed ] and common garnishes include onions, sauerkraut, jalapeños, chili, grated cheese, coleslaw, bacon, and olives. [ citation needed ] Hot dog variants include the corn dog and pigs in a blanket. The hot dog's cultural traditions include the Nathan's Hot Dog Eating Contest and the Oscar Mayer Wienermobile.

These types of sausages were culturally imported from Germany and became popular in the United States. It became a working-class street food in the U.S., sold at stands and carts. The hot dog became closely associated with baseball and American culture. Although particularly connected with New York City and its cuisine, the hot dog eventually became ubiquitous throughout the US during the 20th century. Its preparation varies regionally in the country, emerging as an important part of other regional cuisines, including Chicago street cuisine. [6] [7] [8]


Hot dog

A hot dog [1] [2] (less commonly spelled hotdog [3] ) is a food consisting of a grilled or steamed sausage served in the slit of a partially sliced bun, [4] and much debate has centered around whether or not it can be considered a sandwich the term can also refer to the sausage itself. The sausage used is a wiener (Vienna sausage) or a frankfurter (Frankfurter Würstchen, also just called frank). The names of these sausages also commonly refer to their assembled dish. [5] Hot dog preparation and condiments vary worldwide. Typical condiments include mustard, ketchup, mayonnaise, relish, and cheese sauce, [ citation needed ] and common garnishes include onions, sauerkraut, jalapeños, chili, grated cheese, coleslaw, bacon, and olives. [ citation needed ] Hot dog variants include the corn dog and pigs in a blanket. The hot dog's cultural traditions include the Nathan's Hot Dog Eating Contest and the Oscar Mayer Wienermobile.

These types of sausages were culturally imported from Germany and became popular in the United States. It became a working-class street food in the U.S., sold at stands and carts. The hot dog became closely associated with baseball and American culture. Although particularly connected with New York City and its cuisine, the hot dog eventually became ubiquitous throughout the US during the 20th century. Its preparation varies regionally in the country, emerging as an important part of other regional cuisines, including Chicago street cuisine. [6] [7] [8]


Hot dog

A hot dog [1] [2] (less commonly spelled hotdog [3] ) is a food consisting of a grilled or steamed sausage served in the slit of a partially sliced bun, [4] and much debate has centered around whether or not it can be considered a sandwich the term can also refer to the sausage itself. The sausage used is a wiener (Vienna sausage) or a frankfurter (Frankfurter Würstchen, also just called frank). The names of these sausages also commonly refer to their assembled dish. [5] Hot dog preparation and condiments vary worldwide. Typical condiments include mustard, ketchup, mayonnaise, relish, and cheese sauce, [ citation needed ] and common garnishes include onions, sauerkraut, jalapeños, chili, grated cheese, coleslaw, bacon, and olives. [ citation needed ] Hot dog variants include the corn dog and pigs in a blanket. The hot dog's cultural traditions include the Nathan's Hot Dog Eating Contest and the Oscar Mayer Wienermobile.

These types of sausages were culturally imported from Germany and became popular in the United States. It became a working-class street food in the U.S., sold at stands and carts. The hot dog became closely associated with baseball and American culture. Although particularly connected with New York City and its cuisine, the hot dog eventually became ubiquitous throughout the US during the 20th century. Its preparation varies regionally in the country, emerging as an important part of other regional cuisines, including Chicago street cuisine. [6] [7] [8]


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Comments:

  1. Harlan

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  2. Yozshura

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